Why we need to fix our homes to fix agriculture.

I founded Just Grow to start somewhere; to raise awareness about the global threat that is conventional agriculture. Our first product is part form, part function, and is powered by aquaponics. It is named Malawi, to pay homage to one of the oldest and largest freshwater lakes in the Great Rift Valley of Africa. Lakes are balanced and synchronized ecosystems; they’re a source of inspiration and philosophy for our garden. While aquaponics won’t feed the world, it’s a living example of one of the many alternatives to growing food. It’s a statement piece designed to initiate a conversation about the future of food.

CONGRESSIONAL URBAN AGRICULTURE PRODUCTION ACT COULD HELP ELIMINATE URBAN FOOD DESERTS AND STRENGTHEN URBAN AG

To date, little has been done at the federal level to help bolster urban agriculture in cities across the US. But with agriculture currently on the agenda as the next Farm Bill reauthorization quickly approaches, Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur (OH-09) introduced the Urban Agriculture Production Act in September. This bipartisan bill aims to support nutritional and farmers’ market programs and help create the next generation of local, urban farmers and food producers. 

This solar-powered floating farm combines agriculture and dining under one roof

When you imagine a farm, this is probably the last thing you’d think of… and that’s precisely its appeal! Called Lotus, this floating architecture is at once a space for growing veggies, dining, and socializing within urban environments. The structure utilizes a vertical design to house its various hydroponic and greenhouse stations. Inside and out, visitors and diners can enjoy waterside views and watch and learn more about their food growing as they dine. Designed to be built on waterways and lakes within cities, they capitalize on centrally located free space to avoid interfering with the existing structures.

How to feed a hungry city

How does Toronto's garden grow? With fish farms, rooftop planters and vegetable patches all in a row. The city has become a leader in urban agriculture, but there's worry public awareness is lagging as new projects struggle to take root.